#Hashtag of the Week

This week, as I wasted time on–AHEM, I mean as I QUICKLY GLANCED at–my Twitter feed, I noticed #AskJack2 was trending globally.  My natural curiosity led me to click on the hashtag and it took me to this page which was full of questions for someone apparently named Jack.

Jack Harries, I learned, was a child TV star in the UK (he was on the BBC rather than the Disney channel) and vlogger (that’s “video blogger”).  He has over 576,000 followers on Twitter, almost 966,000 subscribers on YouTube with over 45,000,000 views of his videos, and an impressive quiff hairdo.  He even has his own Wikipedia entry!  While he doesn’t have a website yet, he has made the smart move of buying both “jackharries.co.uk” and “jacksgap.com”.  He often makes videos with his twin brother, and from the couple that I’ve watched, they’re actually kind of cute and fun in a very teenage-cool kind of way.

Yes, I said “teenage”.  This guy is nineteen.  And this 19-year-old has established his personal brand more successfully than a lot of celebrities.  His use of social media is consistent in its tone-of-voice and general theme:

Screen Shot 2013-01-27 at 5.53.51 PM
This guy could school many people (including me) on successful branding.

If anyone is looking for a very simple, fun example of how to manage a personal brand, this guy’s got it right.  He’s upbeat, positive, and entertaining because he enjoys doing fun, every day things.  One could argue that his apparent mastery of his personal brand comes from growing up in a generation where people “live” online, and one could also argue that sharing so much of yourself with millions of internet viewers is perhaps not the wisest idea, but hey, he’s over 18 and that’s his choice.

My point is that he strikes a perfect balance between brand identity (as in, how the brand sees itself) and brand image (how the brand is viewed by the public).  Both he and his followers describe him as “cheeky, fun, and a bit random.”  There you have it.  That’s brand equity for you.  Jack has set the tone for how people view him (or his “branded” version of himself), and if he continues to manage this successfully he will make quite a name for himself.  This kid just needs to post “good morning!” on Twitter and he gets hundreds of responses and retweets.  You can’t buy that kind of engagement, folks.

I’m curious to see where he’ll go in terms of internet celebrity and if his will be a sustainable business model (Justin Bieber, anyone?).  The work he’s doing online now may very well bring him success in his dream job as a television presenter.  In any case, bravo to Jack, and I wish him all the best.

Each week I will post my thoughts on a trending global #hashtag on Twitter.

Raclette Lunch

Today’s raclette lunch with our dear friends Rafa and Esther was nearly a miss.  For the simple reason that my raclette machine, being from Switzerland, is built for 240 volts, whereas the voltage here in Canada is only 110…  Our cheese melted veeeeeeeeeeery sloooooooooowly…  Soooooo slowly that we pretty much polished off the potatoes, viande séchée, broccoli and pickles before even the first tray was ready.

Eventually, though, the cheese melted just enough for us to be able to spread it over our potatoes (no pouring action involved, we were too impatient to let it get that liquid).  The result was a fine raclette.  Chico and I had bought two types of cheese: one imported Swiss raclette cheese which had the wonderful tang that we associate with the dish.  The other was a locally made cheese from Oka which was much greasier (the grease dripped off the trays as we poured it) and sweeter.  While nice, it didn’t have the same zip to it as our beloved Swiss raclette.

Why is the cheese gone??
Why is the cheese gone??

Obviously, that didn’t stop us from devouring it all.  Now it’s time for a cheese coma.  Zzzzzzz…

EDITED: CBC Human Library Project

The following is a re-post of my original report on the Human Library Project, with some corrections.  Thanks to Lela for her feedback and contribution!

As I wrote earlier this week, I went to the Atwater Library in Westmount this morning to participate in the Human Library project.  I had signed up to speak with Lela Savic, a Romani journalist and documentary maker.  She was interning at the Human Library project, and considering her background they invited her to be one of the human libraries this year.

If you watch her introductory video, you will learn that Lela was born in Serbia (then Yugoslavia) and when the war broke out when she was five, her family emigrated to Canada.  I briefly described to her how I am from Switzerland and in Geneva there is a very negative perception of Romani as beggars, pickpockets and thieves.  I asked her to describe her background to me so that I could see a different perspective of Romani.

Lela described how she grew up in Canada as any “normal” kid would.  She studied at Concordia University, she has travelled, worked, and maintained her connection with her family roots back in Serbia (in fact, throughout our conversation, she referred to “her village” in Serbia as home, rather than Montreal).  She told me she feels that the fundamental difference between Romani culture and others is that it is a very old, traditional culture.  It is not that different from many southern European cultures, but it is very insular.  For that reason many Romani (especially women) have little interest in education, development or what is going on outside of their group.  This often results in issues in healthcare and a lack of empowerment of women (though in her family, she and her siblings were all encouraged to study, regardless of gender).  Since so few people know anything about Romani culture, Lela feels that many do not understand her cultural perspective.

It was fascinating discussing Gadjo (or non-Romani) perceptions of her people, but also how Romani groups view each other.  She said that here in Canada Romani are viewed in romantic light: when she tells people she is Romani it often inspires images of an exotic “Esmerelda” who dances and sings.  Or, she is asked if her family is nomadic and travels around all the time.  However, in Europe, she hesitates to disclose that she is Romani.  She often gets very negative reactions which range from distrust to outright hostility.  Though she said she has one cousin who is a successful businesswoman in Belgrade, she has other cousins who have been shut out of the business world in Europe because they are Romani.

Lela comes from a community that is sedentary and lives in a group of six neighboring villages in Serbia.  They have intermarried, grown and established themselves as mostly farmers.  There are other groups of Romani who travel, and engage in what are negatively viewed as the stereotypical activities of the Romani, such as pickpocketing, begging, etc.  She said that among Romani there is a specific word for these groups, and they are often looked down upon for “giving Romani a bad name.”  However, because many Romani share the experience of being marginalized and discriminated against, there is an understanding that these groups often have no other choice. It is a vicious cycle: because they are rejected by society as thieves and beggars, they must become just that in order to survive, thus further reinforcing the negative stereotypes.  When one thinks about it, it is heartbreaking to think that a whole group of people is stuck in this wheel.

Lela’s goal is to continue working to educate the outside world about her culture.  She would also like to work as an activist among Romani, as she believes Romani people will more readily accept social reform initiated by one of their own, rather than from perceived outsiders.  Our conversation was fascinating, though brief, and it accomplished the goal the Human Library project set out to do: it opened my eyes to a different perspective and reminded me to always challenge stereotypes and be open to changing preconceived ideas.

After my conversation with Lela, I had a little time to spare, so I asked who would be available for a conversation starting at 11:30.  I had a fascinating conversation with Gabrielle Bouchard, a trans woman who spent most of her life as man, and transitioned to life as a woman in her late thirties.  I will tell you more about our chat in another post, though, as this one is getting on the long side.

Happy Saturday everyone, and have a good weekend!

If you are interested in hearing some of Lela’s interviews with members of the Roma community, you can listen to her interview with Kristin Molnar, her discussion on stereotypes, and her conversation about discrimination against Romani people in Croatia.  Please note that some of these interviews are conducted in French, so if you were looking for a good reason to learn French, here you have it!  I highly recommend you give these a listen.