#Hashtag of the Week 2

super-bowlA major trending topic in North America this week has been, unsurprisingly, the #Superbowl!  Woo-hoo!  American football!  How FUN!

Alright, I have to confess that I know very little about American football, and I have little to no interest in the game (rugby is my bag, baby!).  However, the Superbowl is more than just a football game.  It is a showcase of all that is good (?) about US culture.  The concert at half time features some of the US’s top artists (and sometimes foreigners, like that crazy Paul McCartney!).  Perhaps an even more important representation of American culture, though, are the Superbowl ads.

The Superbowl captures a HUGE national audience, and advertisers know that they have to step up to the plate (whoops, is that a baseball analogy?) to break through the clutter.  And the pressure is on to perform: with a price tag of about $4 million for a 30-second spot, a flop would make for a pretty expensive failure.  Over the years it has become tradition for brands to prepare their cleverest, most attention-grabbing ads for the Superbowl.  Some have lived on in our collective memories (we all remember the first time we encountered the man our men could smell like) and others have gone down in history as the worst ads ever.

Ad Age published an article listing the commercial spaces bought by which companies, but I’m afraid I spent so long on the article that AdAge.com got mad at me and demanded I subscribe in order to continue reading.  Needless to say, I did not subscribe.  However, I do remember that the list includes giants like Coca-Cola, Pepsi, Chevrolet and Oreos, among others.  There are also some relative newcomers on the scene such as GoDaddy.com.  Some brands release their ads for some pre-game exposure before the big day, while others keep them dead secret until Superbowl Sunday.  They hope the clips will go viral, and eagerly look forward to the online conversations their spots will generate.  Already Twitter is abuzz with comments about the pre-released ads, and a significant number of tweets with the #Superbowl hashtag have nothing to do with football.  It will be interesting to follow the reaction to this year’s commercials and see if they have better luck than Volkswagen so far.

If you weren’t planning to watch the Superbowl, perhaps you’ll reconsider simply for the pleasure of seeing these commercials.  Who knows, you could see the ad that will spark the next viral video craze!  Or, if you can’t even bring yourself to watch it for the ads, you can browse through Mashable’s top ten Superbowl commercials of all time.

Happy Superbowl Sunday!

Jane

The Brain In Jane works mainly in the rain. It's always raining somewhere. Find me on Twitter, Google+, and Pinterest.

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