Pregnancy Is A Waiting Game

Hooray! I’m 37 weeks pregnant! For those who don’t count pregnancy in weeks, that means I’m 8 and a half months pregnant, or 2.5 weeks away from my due date. As of 37 weeks, this baby is officially full-term, meaning he could come ANY MINUTE.

Any minute.

Any minute now…

Has it been a minute?

WHY ISN’T MY WATER BREAKING OMG??!!

First and Second Trimesters: A Breeze!

thebraininjane.com 34 weeks pregnant

Believe it or not, at this point things weren’t too hard.

When you’ve had a pregnancy as easy as mine (I swear, I was BUILT FOR THIS), trimesters one and two are a breeze.

If it hadn’t been for my getting slowly fatter (and knocking over wine glasses with my belly), I could have forgotten I was pregnant. It wasn’t until I started feeling the baby’s movements that I could really believe it.

Even at the start of the third trimester, things weren’t that hard. Yeah, I’d get winded quickly, and I was starting to feel quite a bit bulkier. But nothing compares to the past week or so.

Third Trimester: The Waiting Game

Suddenly, I feel like I have BALLOONED. Standing for long periods of time is uncomfortable, but so is sitting because all my vital organs have been shoved up into my ribcage, making my lungs feel a bit crowded.

pregnancy is a waiting game

I may be smiling but I’m struggling to breathe.

Normally an active person, getting out of the house has been difficult. The weather doesn’t help (thank you, Montreal), and the fear of slipping on the sheets of ice that cover the sidewalks makes my ventures tentative and short.

So what to do? Low on energy, feeling huge and lumbering, I spend a lot of my days indoors, knitting, reading, sewing, finishing off the last things on my to-do list.

But mostly, I feel like I’m just waiting. Yup, pregnancy is a waiting game.

The Worst Is Not Knowing When

People wait for their delayed flights at LaGuardia Airport in New York

This is what the last weeks of pregnancy feel like.

I’m an organized person. I like to plan things out and get my logistics in order. I’m not obsessive or anything, but I am not the best at improvising (unless, of course, I have planned to improvise…).

Waiting for this baby to come is like waiting on a delayed flight. You know your flight will be leaving at some point–it’s inevitable–, but you don’t know when. You don’t want to wander too far from the waiting area at the gate in case they make an announcement, but the all-knowing voice over the loudspeaker isn’t giving you any information. It seems that only God knows when your plane will start boarding.

At this point, only God knows when this baby will decide to get the party started. Braxton-Hicks contractions are like the movements of the airline personnel up at the gate desk: you think something is getting started, but then it’s always a false alarm.

And so I wait.

What to Do? Be Ready.

The only thing that I can do is try as best as possible to get on with life, and be ready. My organized self has prepared as much as possible. Here’s a helpful list of what you can do to be ready:

  • Have your hospital bag packed. You can find some useful lists of stuff here and here.
  • Get hubby to pack a bag! Several friends have pointed out that they completely forgot to prepare PJs or anything for Dad.
  • You need a hospital bag for baby, too!
  • Cook up some food and freeze it. I hear you’ll be glad you did this when you get home from the hospital.
  • Keep your phone charged and have your charger with you ALWAYS.
  • Carry around a maxi pad. Okay, this may sound weird, but what if you’re out and your water breaks? It can happen in a gush, but it can also happen in a trickle, so have a maxi pad ready on hand, just in case.
  • Download a new ebook, some podcasts or episodes on your phone or tablet, for distraction purposes during long hours of labor.
  • Have all your documents, birth plan, ID, etc., ready to go.

Other than that, the only thing you can do is distract yourself. I’ve decided to do so by hosting a dinner party. Because, what could go wrong, right?

What It’s All About

Honestly, what it all boils down to is this: I’m really excited to meet this kid. I’m impatient to see his face, to hear his voice and to get to know him with my Chico.

That’s what makes this waiting game so difficult. Delicious anticipation.

Mom’s Favorite German Vegetable Soup

The weather is turning chilly and it’s time to break out the soup recipes! Keep your bellies warm and mouths watering with this delicious traditional German vegetable soup–a particular favorite of my mom’s.

German Vegetable Soup

  • 1 large onion
  • 2 stalks celery
  • 6 medium potatoes
  • 2 large carrots
  • 1.5 liter water
  • 1 veggie bouillon cube
  • (Alternatively, if you have stock in a brick or homemade broth, use that–but you will need to check your salt levels)
  • 1 tsp dill seed
  • 1 tsp caraway seed
  • Cream to taste
Slight changes: I only had small carrots and onions, so I used more.

Slight changes: I only had small carrots and onions, so I used more.

Grab a big soup pot (I like my trusty le Creuset). Heat some oil in your pot and sauté the onion and celery (I tend to use olive oil because that’s what Chico likes).

Onion & celery go in!

Onion & celery go in!

Meanwhile, peel and chop the potatoes and carrots into bite-size pieces. Once chopped, add them to the pot and sauté about a minute or two.

Anyone else hate chopping carrots?

Anyone else hate chopping carrots?

Add the water & bouillon (or stock or broth, whatever you’ve got), dill seed and caraway seed. Bring to a boil and cook until the veggies are done (probably about 15 minutes–but check with a fork).

Mmmmm... The spices smell wonderful.

Mmmmm… The spices smell wonderful.

Add cream to taste. I like to add enough to make it a bit milky-looking.

Mmmm... creamy goodness!

Mmmm… creamy goodness!

Fun tip: If you want an even creamier consistency, but still like to have chunks in your soup, transfer half the soup to a large bowl. Using an immersion blender, whizz it until it’s nice and smooth, then transfer back to the main soup pot.

Blending half the soup makes its texture even creamier.

Blending half the soup makes its texture even creamier.

Voilà! You’ve got a nice creamy soup with some chunky texture.

Bon appétit!

(I’m not sure what makes this soup German. Anyone have a clue?)

Trendy Triangle Baby Blanket

Triangles are all the rage these days. Just a glance through DIY décor ideas on Pinterest will tell you that much.

Seeing as our friend Perrin PimPim has been bitten by the triangle bug, Taloline and Clelola decided a homemade triangle baby blanket would make the perfect baby shower gift for her. They weren’t wrong!

Picking the Pattern

Photo credit from MorganOurs.com

Photo credit from MorganOurs.com

Taloline and Clelola sneakily made use of Pinterest’s secret board feature and created the distractingly named “Choco” board just for us. From there, they went a-searchin’ for triangle patterns.

They decided to go for crochet because it seemed quicker and simpler than knitting for making triangles.

The pattern they decided on is an easy step-by-step tutorial by MorganOurs they found on Pinterest. The slight modification we made was instead of simply not crocheting the last stitch on each end, we decided to do a decrease stitch on the ends for a cleaner look.

Choosing the Yarn

Berroco_vintage_yarn_crochetThe girls decided on a color scheme of 7 complementary colors and visited Mouliné Yarns here in Montreal to pick out the best yarn.

The yarn had to be, of course, machine washable for practicality! So they picked out an old, reliable option: Berroco Vintage yarn. It’s a wool-acrylic blend and it comes in a wide variety of beautiful colors.

To Work!

We each had to do at least 4 triangles, and those of us with more experience crocheting did a couple more. The pattern said to use a 4.5mm hook, but since we were three different people with three different tensions, we all ended up using different sizes to get the final triangle size right.

After a couple of screw-up attempts (Taloline and I found ourselves decreasing too quickly), we finally got the hang of it and started producing our beautiful triangles.

I crochet in the back, while the girls crochet in both.

I crochet in the back, while the girls crochet in both.

As we worked, though, we realized our triangles looked different! Mine had more of a textured look, while Clelola’s and Taloline’s were smoother. A little investigating soon told us why:

I learned to crochet in the back loop only (see figure) rather than in both loops. The others crochet in both loops.

We decided, though, rather than have me do my triangles over again, that the different textures looked quite nice when put together. We would just have to be sure to mix my triangles in well with the others’.

Placement of the Colors

triangle_crochet_blanket_schema

Color coding the blanket

In one evening, after finishing up our last triangles and deciding who was to make which half-triangles and in which colors, Clelola set about placing the colors in the right order.

This was delicate because we didn’t want colors to repeat too frequently within a row or a column. Clelola spent quite some time placing the triangles on the floor, trying to decide what would work best.

We probably could have used some kind of Excel spreadsheet to place them so that they were mathematically correct, but whatever. It looked fine to us.

Blocking the Triangles

I was given all the finished triangles to block, and took this responsibility very seriously!

Some people block simply by ironing the piece with a towel placed between the iron and the crocheting, to avoid squishing the pattern too much. I learned, though, that the best way to block is to fully wet an item and pin it out to dry.

So that’s what I did. Using my new washing machine’s delicate wool cycle (how I love it!), I washed all the triangles and pinned them out on my bed over some towels. It was a tedious process, and I had to do a lot of stretching and measuring to try to get them all the same size.

Blocking_crochet_blanket

 

In the end, I finally also ironed them for good measure. Oh well.

Assembling the Rows

We were each assigned a row or two and our homework over the next couple of weeks was to sew our designated rows together. I, of course, finished mine just before the girls came over to assemble all the rows together (whoops! Procrastinator!).

Building_Perrine_Blanket

Sorry, the photo’s a bit blurry

But finally, once we had sewn it all together (with only one restart), and Clelola had added the border, it looked stunning:

Finished_Triangle_Crochet_Baby_Blanket

 

Optional: Sewn-On Backing

To add a touch of class (and to incorporate another craft) to the project, we visited Effiloché and picked out a great fabric to add as a backing to the blanket.

Normally, if sewn correctly, there is neither a “right side” or a “wrong side” to a blanket like this (it’s a bit like a granny square blanket). But we liked the idea of making it feel like a quilt-crochet combo.

So Taloline broke out the sewing machine and added the cutest fabric to the back:

triangle_crochet_baby_blanket_backing

Perrin PimPim’s other half is a photographer, so we thought he’d enjoy this fabric on the baby’s blanket.

Needless to say, we were all mightily pleased with the result, and Perrin PimPim was delighted, both by her surprise baby shower and by her homemade gift for her little bundle of joy.

Thank you to Taloline and Clelola for organizing the gift idea and for a fun time putting it all together!